Florida Medical Examiners report shows decline in opioid and fentanyl-related deaths
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Florida Medical Examiners report shows decline in opioid and fentanyl-related deaths

TAMPA — Matt Morgan says opioid addiction is more dangerous now than ever before.

“If I had taken painkillers because of my addiction 18-20 years ago, I would have been dead 35 times over, make no mistake, because I didn’t have to worry about my painkillers being laced with fentanyl.”

Morgan claims he became addicted to opioids while recovering from an injury he suffered as a professional wrestler.

He says the addiction lasted five years.

“I couldn’t go four hours without taking 100 to 120 milligrams of oxycodone or hydrocodone.”

Morgan says he is one of the lucky ones who finally got help.

He has been in therapy for 18 years.

And he devoted himself to a political career, serving two terms as mayor of Longwood, north of Orlando.

“Everyone has a different bottom. I am beyond blessed. I have an amazing wife, Larissa, who helped me not lose my marriage, my home, and other things to hit bottom.”

Morgan joined Florida Attorney General Ashley Moody and FDLE Commissioner Mark Glass to announce a statewide decline in drug, opioid and fentanyl-related deaths.

The latest report from the Florida Medical Examiners covering the first six months of 2023 shows a 10 percent decline in deaths caused by fentanyl and opioids.

The report also said there was a 7 per cent drop in overall drug-related deaths.

This is the third year in a row that this number has declined.

Moody says the state is seeing progress thanks to a massive anti-drug effort by local law enforcement agencies.

“We’re putting money into local agencies, giving them the resources they need to investigate these individuals and seize fentanyl, and it’s working.”

Moody says Florida is a state that leads the nation in seizing fentanyl, a drug that is deadly even in small amounts and is often cut into other drugs sold on the black market.

“I am optimistic about the work we are doing and the results we are seeing, but the death toll is still far too high.”

More than 7,000 Florida residents died from drug overdoses in the first six months of last year, according to a medical examiner’s report.

If you are looking for help in fighting addiction, you can visit treatmentatlas.org

Florida Medical Examiners report shows decline in opioid and fentanyl-related deaths

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