Minors: 84% of teenagers trust doctors, trust in other indicators drops
2 mins read

Minors: 84% of teenagers trust doctors, trust in other indicators drops

Minors: 84% of teenagers trust doctors, trust in other indicators drops

White coats top the list of reference indicators for teenagers. If trust in society’s main interlocutors has collapsed compared to 2014, the percentage of teenagers who trust doctors has increased from 59% (data detected in 2014) to 84% today. Trust in the police is still just over 50%, but has fallen by more than 10 points since 2014 (53% compared to 64%), while judges go against the trend, with trust increasing significantly compared to 2014 (50.6% compared to 28.4% 10 years ago). This is indicated by the national survey of the lifestyle of teenagers living in Italy, edition 2024, carried out annually by the “Laboratorio adolescenti” and the research institute Iard with the operational support of Mediatyche Srl, on a nationally representative sample of 3,427 students aged 13 to 19.

At the bottom of the “table”, where distrust reigns, we find teachers (who have fallen from 70% to 48% in 10 years) and priests (who have also fallen from 52% to 29%). With an even lower trust rate, we find journalists (25%), who are nevertheless growing compared to 2014, when they were trusted only by 10%. While today influencers have 10% (they were not present in the 2014 survey). A veil of silence over the trust placed in the political class: in 2014 it was 3.3% and has managed to fall further to 2.9%. The only “objects” that teenagers fully trust are their parents (90% trust them) and friends (86%). And it is friends who – comparing the answers to the same question asked 10 years ago – are gaining trust (87% compared to 63%), while parents’ trust is decreasing, although slightly (90% compared to 93%).

“Trust, and therefore a sense of security only in a world limited to family and friends,” says Maurizio Tucci, president of the Laboratorio adolescenza, “is clearly a sign of discomfort in the face of the outside world. But retreating into one’s shell like turtles when they are afraid or, to use a term that is fashionable today, closing oneself in one’s “comfort zone” at 16, when one’s desire should be to explore and perhaps conquer the world, is a kind of disturbing contradiction in terms that we should reflect on. Also because, beyond certain thresholds, family risks becoming familialism and friendship a “clan”, if not even a “gang”.